Archive for the ‘Thoughts on Fishing’ Tag

Just in Time for the Weekend   2 comments

I got a delivery today. Looks like somebody’s going to be tying some Steelhead flies this weekend…

 

Raw materials from The Caddis Fly Shop (Click the pic to go there...)

Raw materials from The Caddis Fly Shop (Click the pic to go there…)

Milwaukee Salmon (but not Steelhead)   5 comments

I fished in Milwaukee on Saturday with dozens of my closest friends. There are a lot of guys out there after salmon. I haven’t got the strategy figured out yet for catching migrating salmon legally. I’m suspicious that every salmon caught in the Milwaukee River is caught via a snag. I know this debate rages on forums like Lake-Link.com with some saying they are catching them in the mouth while others go on and on about witnessing fish harvested with treble hooks in the dorsal fin. It sure looked to me like the few hooks that found salmon were stuck in places well back from the mouth.

I’m hoping in the next several weeks the salmon have run their course, the weather gets nasty, and the Steelhead are all that’s left of the lake-run fish. I’ll be out there, with a lot fewer friends, swinging streamers for Steelhead.

Speaking of swinging, I got the hang of the Skagit cast to the degree that I made every fourth or fifth cast very adeptly. I have work to do to get power into my cast so I can get them to reach a little further. Right now I’m basically able to cast the shooting head and about ten feet of running line. I need to slow things down a bit on the forward cast I guess.

Cheers!

 

Salmon Fisherman on the Milwaukee River

Salmon Fisherman on the Milwaukee River

 

 

Milwaukee Salmon and Steelhead Spey Fishing   2 comments

I’ll be heading over to Milwaukee for the weekend to visit family and while I’m there I plan to spend some time in the Milwaukee River, swinging intruder spey flies in front of Salmon and Steelhead.

Steelhead are what I’m after, of course. But I stopped in and talked with Craig Amacker, the fishing manager over at Fontana Sports in Madison. Craig relayed a story to me about a quick trip he took up to the Sheboygan River the day before. There were some salmon in the river, as you’d expect, and Craig was swinging flies. He found that many of the salmon were moving a long way to smash a fly. If I get some salmon in this manner I’ll be pleased. It’s the endless foul-hooking of salmon that I can’t stand.

So anyway…

Salmon moving to flies? Sure.

Steelhead moving to flies? You betcha!

Perhaps the odd lake-run Brown Trout? Bring it.

I have started to try tying Intruder-style streamers this fall. I found some inspiration at the Oregon Fly Fishing Blog where they have a page full of videos showing how to tie steelhead fly patterns. Last night I tied my first tube fly. We’ll see how they work out in Milwaukee…

 

Tom's "Olde Seminal Vesicle" Steelhead Intruder fly

Tom’s “Olde Seminal Vesicle” Steelhead Intruder fly

 

Tom's "Patrick Petitjean" Steelhead Intruder fly (Click image for a special treat)

Tom’s “Patrick Petitjean” Steelhead Intruder fly (Click image for a special treat)

 

 

 

Why should you put the big fish back?   3 comments

Here’s why you shouldn’t harvest that 30-inch brown you pulled out of the Driftless. Why we don’t have slot limits in our trout streams is beyond me.

Field and Stream touts Wisconsin’s Driftless Trout Fishing   Leave a comment

Uh oh. The cat has been let out of the bag.

Well, maybe not to the degree a front page spread in the New York Times would garner. But Field and Stream, no slouch in the outdoor sporting world, has a short missive on fishing Wisconsin’s Driftless.

The descriptions all sound accurate to me. The technical nature of fishing small spring-fed creeks, the hassles of casting a fly to a spot surrounded by willow saplings, the challenge of navigating country roads past gruff and grim farmers to find pools of 8″ fish, all separate the small stream anglers from those who’d prefer to sit on their bass boats and suck Miller Lite all day.

Let’s face it. There a large helping of “fu-king around” that goes into a day of fishing in the Driftless. It can be hot, buggy, dirty, mucky, and unfulfilling. But if you figure it out, it can be that thing you find it hard to stop daydreaming about.

So let the magazines tout the Driftless. The Driftless deserves it! More press means more attention spent on keeping it nice, on ensuring these beloved streams flourish.

 

Camp Creek on a summer morning

Camp Creek on a summer morning

 

 

 

Black Earth Creek Headwaters   1 comment

I visited Black Earth Creek for an hour yesterday, aspiring to catch some trout on the last day of the inland waters trout season in Wisconsin. I knew it was a long shot though. The sun was out and the sky was blue, but moreover I was fishing in Cross Plains at Zander Park, a spot that just two months ago was being fully rejiggered by diesel-powered earthmovers and men in hard hats.

I saw another angler downstream of the now defunct On The Creek Fly Shop, so I started fishing the second pool in the “re-meandered” section. I saw a few little fish scatter as I moved along, drifting my nymph along. I moved up past the new bridge into the section of the stream that had not been reworked. Funny thing is though, it was getting reworked. With the gradient downstream restored to its more natural state, the speed of the water upstream has increased and now, instead of lots of muck and silt on the streambed, there are beautiful stones and patches of gravel. Water Cress grows along the banks, accompanied by Jewel Weed and Black-Eyed Susans.

Wading upstream, what used to be a chore in slogging through silt is now a pleasant and easy amble with solid footfalls. Trout will find plenty of places to drop their eggs and spawn, and hopefully multiply appreciably.

I look forward to visiting this spot next spring. As seasons come and go, the habitat will settle in, and so will the fish.

 

Black Earth Creek, upstream of the Zander Park bridge

Black Earth Creek, upstream of the Zander Park bridge

 

The cool clear water of Black Earth Creek, running over the newly scoured streambed

The cool clear water of Black Earth Creek, running over the newly scoured streambed

 

 

Beastly Brown   2 comments

Stephen Rose, Gregg Kissel and I found ourselves in the Wisconsin Driftless late last week pursuing fall trout in a beautiful spring-fed creek. This particular creek, a trib of the Blue River, was littered with Chubs, which is usually cause for an obstreperous outing. Indeed, many of the fish brought to hand were Chubs, but the upside, at least in theory, was that any trout lurking in the big pools of this little creek were likely to have dined on Chubs, giving the trout license to grow big and beastly.

Stephen was dredging a pool with a white woolly bugger downstream from me. I heard a holler from him and turned around to see his rod arched into a crescent, his line piercing the water and vibrating like a banjo string. I ran toward him to lend a hand. I waded into the pool and scooped the fish at the exact moment the knot on his hook eye failed. In four years of fly fishing for Driftless spring creek trout, this is the largest Stephen has caught. We didn’t get a measurement but by any appraisal it’s a nice fish for a stream that probably has a flow rate of 10 cubic feet per second.

After some photos Stephen put him back and he darted for the depths to regain his strength for the upcoming spawn, and to grow even larger for another encounter in the future.

 

Stephen Rose with a nice Wisconsin Driftless Brown

Stephen Rose with a nice Wisconsin Driftless Brown

 

Wisconsin's Driftless Region in late September

Wisconsin’s Driftless Region in late September

 

 

Native “Coaster” Brook Trout in Milwaukee River   5 comments

I checked the Mequon-Thiensville Fishway Camera website this morning and got a big surprise. A picture of a native Coaster Brook Trout swimming upstream in the Milwaukee River.

This would not be so shocking to find in a tributary of Lake Superior, but I never imagined a Brook Trout would be swimming up the Milwaukee River. It goes to show that tearing down dams really does allow a river to support more wildlife.

If Grafton and West Bend would tear down their decrepit dams these Coasters would have a true shot at making their way up to Brook Trout spawning habitat in the Northern Kettle Moraine headwaters. Can you imagine the Milwaukee River being home to the only native anadromous salmonid? How cool would that be? Could West Bend become the Coaster Capital of the Midwest?

 

A Coaster Brook Trout swimming past the fishway camera in the Milwaukee River in Thiensville, WI

A Coaster Brook Trout swimming past the fishway camera in the Milwaukee River in Thiensville, WI

 

 

Brule River Sportsmen’s Club   Leave a comment

I’ve been reading the newsletters of the Brule River Sportsmen’s Club over the past few weeks and have learned a lot about their work to improve the Brule River fishery. One of the most incredible projects is the “Gravel Drops” they collaborated with the National Guard on years ago. The photos are really intriguing. Gravel, of course, is an important substrate for trout and salmon spawning and it allows the eggs a safe place to lie during maturation. Check out the pictures on their website. I think you’ll enjoy them.

I have also gleaned from the Club’s newsletters that they’re struggling a bit financially. This is a real shame, because their work has helped make the Brule a healthy fishery, giving all who fish it better opportunities to experience the tug of a wild Lake Superior Steelhead.

I am planning to send in my membership form with $20, and I’m also going to add a bit extra to help with the Habitat Fund. I’ll purchase a map and a cap as well and I encourage you to do the same, whether you’re an angler who loves the Brule, or just someone who loves the idea of the Brule.

 

National Guard and Brule River Sportsmen's Club members spread gravel at Mott's Ravine Bend in the Brule River. Click the photo to see the gallery.

National Guard and Brule River Sportsmen’s Club members spread gravel at Mott’s Ravine Bend in the Brule River in 1995. Click the photo to see the gallery.

 

 

Los Angeles   5 comments

I’m going to LA next week for work. The guys in our office in Hollywood joked that I should fish the LA River. Big carp and catfish dwell there in Los Angeles, where “A Sewer Runs Through It”.

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