Behavioral Drift of Aquatic Insects   3 comments

Have you found that fishing for trout in the morning or the evening gives you better action than fishing in the middle of the day. I have. I’ve always attributed it to water temp or trout hiding from the bright sunlight. These may be factors, but there’s another element that I just recently became aware of. Smart guys call it the Diurnaly Periodic Behavioral Drift of aquatic insects.
 
I call it bugs that let go and float downstream at around the same time every day.
 
Stephen yearning for some diurnal periodicity to help him catch some trout
Stephen yearning for some diurnal periodicity to help him catch some trout

 

Behavioral drift: The nymphs and larvae of many aquatic insects sometimes release their grip on the bottom and drift downstream for a while with synchronized timing. This phenomenon increases their vulnerability to trout just like emergence, but it is invisible to the angler above the surface. In many species it occurs daily, most often just after dusk or just before dawn.

 

Diurnal Periodicity had nothing to do with catching this fish. It was my good looks.
Diurnal Periodicity had nothing to do with catching this fish. It was my good looks.
 
  
According to Todd Opsal at On the Creek Fly Shop in Cross Plains (and, as it turns out, lots of other online resources), Behavioral Drift may play into the general increased success trout fishermen find when fishing before, during, and after the sunrise and sunset.
 
 
  
Diurnal Periodicity? Nope. Good Looks.
Diurnal Periodicity? Nope. Good Looks. 
 
 
 
I’m really looking forward to warmer days ahead. Last year I enjoyed fishing the cool mornings in July when the sun comes up at 5am and the fish are slammin’ bugs. Makes you want to set your alarm early, don’t it?
 
 
 
Okay, the key to success here was that this place was just so damn beautiful. I had nothing to do with it.
Okay, the key to success here was that this place was just so damn beautiful. I had nothing to do with it.
 

3 responses to “Behavioral Drift of Aquatic Insects

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  1. Solid post dude! Can’t wait to put this theory to the test sooner rather than later. You sure it’s got nothin’ to do with aftershave?

  2. No, it’s not the aftershave. But I do know of other seemingly random events in which aftershave can be a catalyst.

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